drawing

There are no straight lines on your body

This drawing took an hour - and I still didn't get her pupils quite right.  However, I was drinking a glass of wine, so maybe that's how it looked to me.

This drawing took an hour - and I still didn't get her pupils quite right.  However, I was drinking a glass of wine, so maybe that's how it looked to me.

The more I draw people's faces, the more I realize how the slightest change in a small curve can radically change the look.  As I improve the curve on an eye lid, I can see the face pop into focus.  If I draw the curve on a jawline incorrectly, the face no longer resembles the person I'm trying to draw.  It's amazing how each little curve makes up who you are.

It's also amazing that there are no straight lines on the human body.  Try to find one.  (If you do, let me know.)  Hair comes pretty close.  We grow up trying to learn how to draw straight lines.  But they are not very useful when drawing nature.

There are also no straight lines in life.  We can organize and strategize and plan all we want, but you know it's not going to turn out exactly how you envisioned it.  The curves are what make your life your life.  My day has already not gone as I expected.  I had success yesterday with the "Dot Top" and then started on a blush tank which may not work out as well.  We'll see tomorrow when I finish it.  But that's life, isn't it?

Update on 30 Days of Drawing

I am finding this "30 Days of Drawing" less stressful than the last.  I am trying to focus on ideas and pieces of a drawing rather than a completing "perfect drawing".  I am mainly copying photographs and other drawings in order to learn the "vocabulary" of the female face.  But hopefully, I will be able to draw "out of my head" one day.

Drawing of a french girl from a photograph.

Drawing of a french girl from a photograph.

This is a copy of a watercolor by  Emma Leonard , who is an awesome illustrator.  I'm hoping to break out the water colors soon.

This is a copy of a watercolor by Emma Leonard, who is an awesome illustrator.  I'm hoping to break out the water colors soon.

I went on vacation last week and lost my pencil, so I resorted to ball point pen.  It actually made me feel even less stressed, because I had to incorporate every line.  The next one is a drawing of Jennifer Morrison from a photograph.  She's much prettier in real life.

celebrity-drawing.jpg
I didn't look at anything while I drew the one above, so I think it's pretty good for "out of my own head".  However, my husband says that she freaks him out, so I decided to go with that for my next one - 

I didn't look at anything while I drew the one above, so I think it's pretty good for "out of my own head".  However, my husband says that she freaks him out, so I decided to go with that for my next one - 

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And my next...

colorful-face.jpg

The rhythm of drawing every day has made me want to make more "art".  I really think creating breeds creativity and discipline breeds discipline.  So, I am going to make a new shirt or dress each day for the next couple of weeks.  I will hopefully have a new top to show you tomorrow.  Gotta go sew...

Using a grid to build your process

Everything [in Abstract Expressionist painting] seemed to hinge on a certain kind of facility and a certain kind of virtuoso performance. But no painting ever got made without a process...”
— Chuck Close, artist

I was inspired this morning to experiment with drawing on a grid (like Chuck Close).  I thought it would make the drawing easier.  So, I printed out a photograph and drew a grid.

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Then, to make it harder (I don't know why I do this to myself), I used colored pens to draw the picture - 

 

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Using the grid actually helped me fine tune some facial shapes and distances.  But it didn't alleviate the stress.  Then, I thought going more abstract like Chuck Close would be less stressful.  So I drew another grid and started filling it in with colored circles -

chuck-close.jpg

Oh, my goodness, this is so hard.  It's not like I didn't already know that, but I just like to prove it to myself.  I don't think I have the patience to finish this.  On the bright side, it does make sewing a shirt seem much much easier.

And it makes me realize that everything we are building in life can be viewed as a grid.  We build our life with tiny grid pieces made out of each moment.  We can only create each individual moment as it happens, but each moment needs to fit together with all of the other pieces in order to make sense as a whole. When you view it from afar, what picture is it creating?  And are we expecting a beautiful picture without spending enough time on each individual piece of the grid?  It takes a stinkin' long time to make a whole picture!

If you are not familiar with Chuck Close, here is one of his paintings that I saw at The Metropolitan Museum in New York - 

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chuck-close-up-close.jpg

This painting stretches from the ceiling to the floor.  Now, that's a long term project.